Category: Library

Writing Your Way Through Conflict

September 11, 2015 | By

by Dr. Bert Pitts Another tool a couple can use to defuse intensity and maintain dialogue (while slowing it down, which helps) is the Marital Journal. This is an excellent thing to try during time-outs, if acceptable to both people. The couple purchases and designates a notebook as their Marital Journal. During the time-out period, […]

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How to Love and Support Those in Grief (and Avoid Inadvertently Adding to their Pain)

September 11, 2015 | By

by Dr. Kristine Hurst-Wajszczuk Note from Dr. Pitts: Kristine is a dear friend and professional singing buddy of mine. She is a Music Professor at UAB (choral conductor, voice teacher, opera director). She possesses great intelligence, depth, and heart, and is an engaging and gifted teacher. Kristine lost her father earlier this year: Her own […]

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You Can’t Go Home (for the Holidays) Again

September 11, 2015 | By

by Daniel Seigel It’s that magical time of year again, when everyone’s hearts are filled with good tidings of joy and love. It’s also that magical time of year when suddenly your calendar fills up with holiday parties, family events, and church services. You might start to ask: the holidays are supposed to be relaxing, […]

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Making the Most of your Holidays

September 11, 2015 | By

by Dr. Bert Pitts Some of our common holiday tips: Focus on why we celebrate the holidays. It is easy to forget, but “holidays” means “holy days.” If you and your family enjoy them, attend holiday worship and music services. Read more scripture. Pray more often. Be more kind to others. Share with and serve […]

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Mindy-Body Connection Exercise: Journey Through a Workout

September 11, 2015 | By

by Dr. Zanaida Griffin With the stressors that constantly surround us, I emphasize to clients the importance of regular exercise. Not only does exercise benefit one’s physical well-being, but also has significant psychological benefits. I regularly attend a studio workout in Homewood that incorporates a mind-body connection that is hugely therapeutic. As gratifying as the […]

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

September 11, 2015 | By

by Katie Vines Many of the problems people face are influenced by how they think and feel about themselves and others. Our beliefs about ourselves shape the way we communicate and respond in all facets of our lives, in relationships, through our behavior, at work, at home, everywhere. Some people develop unhealthy or unrealistic views […]

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AD/HD Medications And Summer: To Take or Not To Take

November 14, 2012 | By

It is that time of year again: The grass is green, the birds are singing, and the school bells will not ring for another couple of months. Since the demand for sustained attention and concentration often are less in the summer, some parents of children with AD/HD question whether or not their children need to […]

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AD/HD 101: Across The Lifespan

November 14, 2012 | By

A wise thought to consider as we begin to think about the evaluation of AD/HD: Everything that looks like AD/HD is not AD/HD. (In fact, much of it is not!) The symptoms of inattentiveness, impulsivity, and restlessness are all quite common and universal. For example, most people tend to experience one or more of them “on a […]

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Personal Change that Works: Forget “Resolutions”

October 17, 2012 | By

Despite their historical popularity, personal “resolutions” (such as those made around New Year’s Day) usually don’t work, and tend to set us up for failure. Specifically, let’s examine a typical New Year’s Resolution: Let’s say I have the thought, then to hold myself accountable, I tell a friend that “losing 15 pounds”   is my New Year’s […]

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Self-Injury: Cutting, Purging, and Other Addictive Behaviors

October 17, 2012 | By

Adolescents who are struggling to find ways to cope with a variety of intense emotions may resort to self-mutilation, also termed self-inflicted violence (SIV). SIV is defined as intentionally harming one’s body, without suicidal intent. These unwise coping attempts include cutting (the most common form of self-injury), burning, hitting oneself, picking at skin, reopening wounds, […]

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